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Recovery Plans

Overview

Recovery plans set out the research and management actions necessary to stop the decline of, and support the recovery of, listed threatened species or threatened ecological communities. The aim of a recovery plan is to maximise the long term survival in the wild of a threatened species or ecological community.

Data and Resources

Blue, Fin and Sei Whale recovery plan 2005-2010
pdfPlanning Document

147.46 KB

This plan was released by the Department of Environment and Heritage and Natural Heritage Trust outlining the measures necessary to protect the endnagered Blue Whale and vulnerable Sei Whale and Fin Whale. The objectives of the plan were to utilise Australian waters as a sanctuary for the whales, offering an opportunity for population recovery while reducing human threats to whales such as commerical whaling.

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National recovery plan for the Chingia Australis
pdfPlanning Document

177.86 KB

The intention of this plan was to halt the decline of the fern C. Australis in the wild and maintain populations in their original locations while raising public awareness about the species to help protect it from human interference, increasing the size of the wild populations, and to increase the amount of information known about the species at the time of the plans release.

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Recovery plan for cave dwelling bats, Rhinolophus philippinesis, Hipposideros semoni, and Taphozous troughtoni 2001-2005
pdfPlanning Document

645.47 KB

In 2001 Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service and the Australian Natural Heritage Trust released a recovery plan for three species of cave dwelling bat Rhinolophus philippinesis, Hipposideros semoni, and Taphozous troughtoni. The objectives of the plan were to clarify the taxonomic status of the three species, ensure the primary roosting and maternity sites were maintained for all species, and to document aspects of the species ecology in order to develop appropriate NRM actions.

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National recovery plan for the red Goshawk Erythrotriorchis radiatus
pdfPlanning Document

374.47 KB

This report was released by several government bodies including the Commonwealth Government with the intention of maintaining populations of the Red Goshawk across Australia and ultimately increasing their population. The actions indentified as necessary to meet these goals were monitoring habitati, collating information, and conducting 'boots on the ground' searches for previously unkown breeding pairs, habitats and nesting sites followed by active protection of identified through different conservation efforts dependant on the individual circumstances.

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Recovery plan for Mabi forest
pdfPlanning Document

1.21 MB

This plan was released in 2008 and produced by the Australian Government and Queensland Environmental Protection Agency with the intention of protecting and rehabilitating the Mabi rainforest and where possible expanding the rainforest into surrounding areas, reversing already existing damage to the rainforest.

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Recovery plan for marine turtles
pdfPlanning Document

501.4 KB

This plan was released in July 2003 by Environment Australia in consultation with the Marine Turtle Recovery tean. Unlike the other threatened species plans, a limited understanding of turtle populations at the time meant that this plan adopted a threat reduction based approach to turtle consevation. The different conservation approach meant all actions undertaken as part of this plan were to reduce the level and impact of threats to turtles, lowering the mortality rate throughout their lifespan and consequently having a positive impact on marine turtle populations.

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National recovery plan for the white bellied subspecies of the Crimson Finch Neochmia phaeton evangelinae, and the northern subspecies of the Star Finch Neochmia ruficauda clarescens
pdfPlanning Document

803.75 KB

This plan was released in 2007 with the ultimate goal of maintaining and increasing the size of wild populations of Crimson and Star finches on the Cape York Peninsula through conservation efforts such as invasive weed reduction in grassland habitats, the implementation of other land management strategies to protect habitat and benefit fauana the finches are dependant on, and active reconolisation measures.

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Recovery plan for the northern bettong Bettongia tropica 2000-2004
pdfPlanning Document

426.72 KB

The Northern Bettong has been classified as endangered under the Queensland Nature Conservation regulation 1994 for some time and thus this plan was produced by the Natural Heritage Trust, Queensland Environmental Protection Agency, and Queensland National Parks and Wildlife Service in 2001 in an effort to protect the species. The ultimate goal of the plan was to halt the decline of then current populations of Northern Bettong as well as growing the existing populations while also establishing new Bettong populations in suitable locations. The actions intended by the plan in order to protect existing Bettong populations were to reduce the impact of introduced predators such as cats and wild dogs, to manage the habitat of known populations with the ultimate aim of conservation, and to develop public support for the program with the aim of increasing the involvement of volunteers and the general community.

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Recovery plan for the Golden Shouldered Parrot Psephotus chrysopterygius 2003-2007
pdfPlanning Document

900.29 KB

The Golden Shouldered Parrot is a small granivore known for nesting inside termite mounds and at the time of this plan's development was restricted to just two small populations in central Cape York Peninsula.

The goals for this plan were to develop and implement land use strategies that would restore grassland and grassy woodland habitats to benefit fauna which the Golden Shouldered Parrot relies on and assist in the recolonisation of former known habitats to ultimately change the threatened species listing for the Golden Shouldered Parrot from endangered to vulnerable.

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National Multi-species Recovery Plan for the Carpentarian Antechinus Pseudantechinus mimulus, Butler’s Dunnart Sminthopsis butleri, and Northern Hopping-mouse Notomys aquilo 2004-2008
pdfPlanning Document

368.63 KB

This plan was published in 2004 by the Natural Heritage Trust with the intention of halting the decline of the populations of three threatened marsupials: the Carpentarian Antechinus, Butler’s Dunnart, and the Northern Hopping-mouse.

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